Oregon, page 6

FJD OR 133. Sweet Home Museum Specimen. Nice cabinet-size and remarkably perfect full round limb section. Cut and polished on one end, otherwise as found. Captivating display of the hardwood anatomy of a diffuse porous hardwood with prominent rays. Some rays are significantly thicker than others, as with beech. Attractive all around, no issues. Mineralization is typical Sweet Home: not as shiny as some and a bit porous, yet beautiful and interesting. No glue/No filler. 49 by 57 mm polished face; 8.5 cm long; thirteen ounces. $150

Note top right tiny dots – rootlets? Borer eggs?
uncut end
borer tunnel

FJD OR 134. Post Museum Specimen. Eocene Clarno formation. Striking cabinet-size specimen round conifer that comprises about 1/12 of the original round, as if from noon to one on the face of a clock. Many pine-like resin canals. Beautifully preserved cell structures. Somewhere along its journey of some 40-50 million years, an ordinary conifer became a work of art. Its tracheid ladders buckled under the weight of lava or mud flows or who-knows-what, forming a series of diamond shapes which infilled with siliceous gels that over eons constructed tiny agates within the diamonds, while the wood all around turned to black. The white layer on one side is agate chalcedony. As found but for one cut and polished face. Top eye appeal and interest. Wood of this type is found at various locations in the Northwest but is scarce, and I do not recall seeing another with diamonds on black. This piece incorporates an element of paleoarthropodology due to an attractive borer tunnel or two with petrified borer-created “saw dust”. One point of the triangle comprises a cluster of tiny dots – let me know if you figure out what they are. No glue/No filler. 85 by 41 at the outside tree edge mirror-polished face by 64 mm long; eight ounces. $175

FJD OR 135. McDermitt Museum Specimen. Miocene Trout Creek formation. This full round branch has a lot going on. It’s an old-time surface-collected piece, a knotty little branch with two glassy limb stumps. Conifer with a bull’s-eye of twelve or more growth rings, a slow grower. Glassy and somewhat opalized at the exterior. Cut and polished on one end, otherwise as found. No glue/No filler. 32 by 35 mm polished face; 9 cm long; six ounces. $115

FJD OR 136. Owyhee Mountains Museum Specimen. Tertiary conifer. Cut and polished on one side (longitudinal), otherwise as found. Gnarly and eye-catching. Captivating bark-like exterior. Super hard and solid. Pleasant colors. No glue/No filler. 7.5 by 7.5 cm polished face; 38 mm thick; twelve ounces. $85

FJD OR 137. South Fork Crooked River Museum Specimen. Oligocene; John Day formation. Full round pink limbcast with superior qualities. One natural end and one end cut and flat-polished to a mirror finish. The exterior is nice all around, displaying obvious wood impression. The gem polished face is stunning and well-balanced. The few surviving wood remnants are clustered into a small ball along what was the geopedal bottom, while the rest became agate. The vug is druzy with quartz crystals. Overall perfection and allure. Glassy. No glue/No filler. 68 by 65 mm polished face; 48 mm thick; eleven ounces.  $175

FJD OR 140. McDermitt Museum Specimen. Miocene Trout Creek formation. Full round branch- an old-time surface-collected piece. Diffuse porous hardwood with an especially perfect black face and an exterior that’s unmistakably wood. The two deep oval divots are probably borer damage (educated guess). Cut and polished on one end, otherwise as found. No glue/No filler. 38 by 48 mm polished face; 10 cm long; ten ounces. $115

natural end

FJD OR 141. Brogan ghost wood museum specimen. Tertiary; Malheur County, OR. A small but a high end specimen round Brogan that tells the Brogan ghost wood story, which, as the theory goes, is young and in the opal stage on the way to chalcedony and the world of agate. See Ancient Forests for a more detailed explanation of the journey from wood to agate. Cut and polished on one end. At first glance one would think it has no cell structures. Many would call it a “cast” and move on. But look closer and the pattern of almost invisible growth rings congeals into view, forming a semi-circular pattern with bits of cellular material here and there. 62 by 42 mm mirror-polished face; 26 mm thick; three ounces. $70

FJD OR 143. McDermitt Zimmerman Ranch Museum Specimen. Miocene Trout Creek formation. Full round branch – an old-time surface-collected piece. Semi-diffuse porous hardwood with absolutely stunning cellular preservation which is almost as distinct on the uncut end as on the polished end. Woody exterior with the distinctive reddish patina of Zimmerman Ranch. Hard and glassy mineralization. Cut and polished on one end, otherwise as found. No glue/No filler. 44 by 40 mm polished face; 8.5 cm long; ten ounces. $115

FJD OR 144. South Fork Crooked River Museum Specimen. Oligocene; John Day formation. Full round pink limbcast with lovely orange/yellow colors on the outside and a beautiful banded agate within. One natural end and one end cut and flat-polished to a mirror finish. The exterior is nice all around, displaying obvious wood impression. The gem polished face is stunning and includes the typical South Fork small batch of cellular material along what was the geopedal bottom. Glassy. No glue/No filler. 33 by 55 mm polished face; 82 mm thick; nine ounces. $115