paperweights: North American others, page 2

PW989. Unidentified crimp rose Museum Piece.Well-centered bright red-orange crimp rose over four stamen in clear crystal with one top and four side flat facets. Excellent condition. E cane in the base. Rare piece. I thought this was made by Drew Ebelhare because of the E cane and because I knew he made some crimp roses, but I asked him and he doesn’t think it’s his cane or weight. 2 3/8 inch diameter; 1 7/8 inches tall; eight ounces. $150

PW1452. Wesley Lutz Red Tulip Museum Piece, circa 1970-1975. Bright cherry red exquisite little tulip. Encased in crystal with top and side flat facets. Rare and stunning. Impeccable work. Mr. Lutz made few weights as a hobby and as gifts for friends. Excellent condition. 2 1/4 inches diameter; 1 7/8 inches tall; eight ounces.  $175

PW2940. John Degenhart crimp rose Museum Piece.This was one of John Degenhart’s most popular weights way back when – 1950s and 1960s. It’s a pink and white crimp rose in a fancy cut “cushion”. This took a lot of work to finish.

If you recognize the name Degenhart, you are familiar with American pioneers of the glass paperweight Renaissance that began in the 1940s with Charles Kaziun and others. The book American Glass Paperweights and Their Makers by Jean Melvin is an essential resource for one interested in this period. Rare piece. Condition is excellent. 1 15/16 inch diameter; 1 9/16 inches tall; seven ounces. $150

PW2978. Elizabeth Degenhart frit lily Museum Piece, signed.An attractive red and yellow frit lily sits at the center of this simple weight. The glass is clear with a big top flat facet and four small round windows on the side. Due to its age–1920s-1930s– it has a few imperfections in the glass, including a small bruise on the side. It’s signed on the base “E. D.”

If you recognize the name Degenhart, you are familiar with American pioneers of the glass paperweight Renaissance. The book American Glass Paperweights and Their Makers by Jean Melvin is an essential resource for one interested in this period. According to this book’s section on the Degenharts, “One distinctive weight of Mrs. Degenhart’s collection is a lily-type flower encased in crystal. The sparkling fragments used to make the flower were crushed from glass waste at the Cambridge (Ohio) factory…. The crystal bits, crushed and then enclosed in the one-of-a-kind weight, have a particular brilliance” I have to wonder if this is the same weight the author saw back in the 1960s. Rare piece. 2 7/8 inch diameter; 2 inches tall; fourteen ounces. $100